April 1st: The Beginning of the End (of the college admission process)

It’s that time of year again that causes both wonderful excitement and intense anxiety!  April 1st has finally arrived.  To some this may mean nothing more than April Fools’ Day, but to Bosque seniors, it’s the national notification day: the deadline for colleges to notify students whether they have been admitted, waitlisted, or denied. By now, our seniors have received all their college admission decisions and have the exhilarating, but daunting task of selecting a school.  Many students have been receiving their college admission decisions for weeks. It’s a process that is full of emotion; some students are finding out that they got into their dream schools while others are faced with being denied from their top choices. Frank Bruni published an op- ed piece in The New York Times a few years ago that still feels highly relevant. He writes about keeping a healthy perspective on the college admissions process.  It’s a great article and I hope many of you will take the time to read it: https://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/15/opinion/sunday/frank-bruni-how-to-survive-the-college-admissions-madness.html
 
The college admissions process is a gamble.  No matter how many scattergrams and plans we have, there is no way to accurately predict every admission offer or denial.  It’s important for students and families to remember that college choice does not dictate who they are or what they will do with their lives.  That being said, Bosque seniors have some excellent options and should be proud of all the hard work they put into their college decisions.    

While April 1st is a long-awaited day, it is by no means the end of the road.  Now comes the even more difficult part—choosing a college. Whether it’s financial considerations, proximity to home, or a desired major, students will choose their college based on a number of factors.  While it is tempting to put your “two cents in” when talking with seniors about their options, I encourage you to be more of a sounding board. It is important to remember that a lot of thought, time, and effort have gone into applying to college, and seniors need space and support to make their big decision.  A few years ago, The New York Times’ blog, The Choice, published advice for students who have been admitted, denied, or placed on a waitlist.  It’s linked here:http://thechoice.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/27/tip-sheet-if-you-are-accepted-rejected-or-deferred/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0  and I encourage students and families to read it.  

In the meantime, please congratulate our seniors when you see them.  They have worked hard and achieved great success in navigating this year’s college process.
 
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